Aragorn’s Lineage

Aragorn’s distant ancestor, Isildur and his battle with Sauron is a perfect representation of David and Goliath in the Bible. Like David, Isildur faced a massive villain who was defeated by a small act. David flung a small rock; Isildur sliced off a finger. Neither action seems enough to defeat a 9+ foot villain, but in both cases led to the demise of a major participant in the destruction of a life-as-we-know-it type of situation.

As we know, Aragorn is the descendent of Isildur. Who in the Bible do we know that is a descendant of David?

Jesus Christ is a descendant of David just as Aragorn is a descendant of Isildur. In the Bible, Jesus Christ is called by many names, similar to the different names of Aragorn. Jesus Christ wasn’t an ordinary man. He was the son of God. For this reason, he was fit to perform the atonement. Aragorn wasn’t an ordinary man either. He was a dunedain. This made him live longer and even influenced his ability to resist the Ring.

The Ring in the books was meant to embody sin and temptation. Knowing this, simply think of a time in the Bible when temptation had a huge role in the development of Christ. Christ was faced with temptations, and so was Aragorn. Aragorn had the opportunity to take the Ring, but he didn’t, just as Christ didn’t fall to Satan’s temptations.

Throughout the books, elves represent an angelic, godly people. They have magic, similar to God’s power, that made them different. Elves represent everything godly, and to be an elf is to be essentially an angel. The dunedain have elf DNA, this makes them as close to a godly being as any human can be, just as Christ was the most perfect any being touched by humanity can be.

Aragorn bares many similarities to Christ throughout Lord of the Rings, but is definitely not the only representation. The deeper the reader looks into each detail of Tolkien’s masterpiece, the more it can be seen that there was even more to Tolkien’s complex fantasies than what any reader can see. Symbolism is a huge part of Tolkien’s work and gives each read just a little more to learn.

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6) After Middle Earth: Detour to Darkness

Freesia barely had time to take a breath when the cold hand fell violently from her shoulder followed by the horrible sound of death. She turned quickly to see a Scar lying dead on the path. Eoborn had skewered it. Before she could release her breath, she saw that the Scar was not alone.

Several other Scars were running from toward them in the distance. They were surrounded.

Freesia didn’t know what to do. She wasn’t sure if she felt safe with Eoborn or not. He did save her life, but who knows his motivations? None of that would matter if they died now.

The fear and pain of never being able to return home was too much to bear. Freesia began to weep. There was nothing else she could think to do to save herself.

From beside her, Freesia felt Eoborn rush toward her. His strong arms wrapped around her small body and hefted her up onto his shoulder. With one arm holding her and the other swinging his sword, Eoborn fought his way through the surrounding Scars. Suddenly, Freesia wasn’t afraid, she knew that Eoborn was good, and he would save both of them. From the awkward angle she was at, she could see his brave, pained face. He looked honorable. Kingly.

The Scars gave them no choice but to run east. Freesia wanted to protest, but twisting around to see the pursuing Scars told her there was no way to reach the Shire. It scared Freesia to see so many dark creatures on the lands of Hobbiton. How was this possible?

They made it into the Maggot fields. Freesia hoped the tall crops would hide them and they might be able to slip away. The rustling of plants and horrible grunts of the Scars was driving Freesia mad. Strangely, amidst the horrible noises, another sound faded into the mix. More sounds. Dogs? Shouting.

Freesia tried to look around and see what was going on, when a small figure stumbled right into Eoborn. Because of the awkwardness of the little hobbit on his shoulder, Eoborn stumbled and lost his grip on her. Freesia fell to the ground, the air unable to keep hold in her lungs. The fear and oxygen deprivation was too much for Freesia to bear, she could no longer keep hold on reality and slipped into darkness.

5) After Middle Earth: Outside

After Freesia had a fair night’s rest in her Hobbit sized room, she wondered if she should trust Eoborn. For a long while she considered running off back to the Shire, hoping Eoborn would just leave, but she knew she couldn’t. Eoborn was already planning on going to the Shire, there’s nothing should could do to stop that. Leaving now would just bring him right back to her in her own home.

She decided she would have to travel with him, at least back to the Shire. Then she could just tell him she would stay and he could find someone who would like to go with him.

Freesia went to the lobby to wait for Eoborn. She sat at the counter and asked the innkeeper if he knew anything about Eoborn, just like Frodo had asked Butterbur about Aragorn. The innkeeper couldn’t seem to remember the man coming into his inn at all.

That was almost enough to convince her to run off before he came back.

She could go to Rivendell; but if there aren’t any elves, who knows if it’s safe or not. She could go find Tom Bombadil. Certainly he would help her, if he is still on Middle Earth that is.

Before Freesia could make any decisions, Eoborn tapped her on the shoulder, causing her to jump.

“Are you prepared for departure?” he asked her. She couldn’t bring herself to speak for a moment.

“Of course,” she said nervously, “shall we be on our way?”

“Alright, let us head out.”

The dwarf gate keeper was reluctant to let them out. It seemed as though he did not trust Eoborn any more than Freesia did. A full grown man with a hobbit child? It seemed unthinkable that she would be traveling with him of her own accord.

As they exited the town, Freesia looked to the sky and noticed the clouds that loomed in the distance. It was impossible to find the sun. It didn’t feel right.

The journey to the Shire seemed much longer when Freesia didn’t feel like she had to run for her life. How far, exactly, had she gone?

The sky seemed to darken, covering any sign of day light. Freesia felt uneasy. What was it about the overcast sky that made her feel so scared? The lack of sun light caused the path under the trees to seem eerie and frightening. As they passed the area where Freesia had seen the Scar, she panicked and tripped on a root.

The sudden shock of the trip caused her to hyperventilate and it took her a moment to regain her wits. The reminder of the terrifying creature caused her to be at constant attention. There could be any of those creatures in the trees, but they hated day time. The sun made them burn up.

The sun.

They were in danger. The sun was hiding far behind the clouds, causing a perfect cover for any tortured creature. Suddenly the presence of the stranger she was following became the least of her worries. It even made her feel slightly better about the ominous road to have someone who may be able to protect her. But it also scared her a bit not knowing if he would be willing to protect her if it came to that.

Every rustle of a leaf or break of a twig made Freesia flinch. The closer to the border of the Shire they got, the safer she felt. She could even smell the crops of the Maggot farm. Farmer Maggot, the hobbit who helped Frodo and Sam on their travels, had created the farm. He planted and nourished the land until it became what is was now. Now his descendants took care of it.

Just before they reached the edge of the farm, a cold hand touched Freesia’s shoulder. It was too late.

4) After Middle Earth: Pegrioc

Eoborn stared at Freesia, confused, who was looking quite terrified. “You alright?” he asked her.

“I…uh…who do you have in mind to go with you?” she asked, worrying he might say her.

“Well, I was actually under the impression that I should ask you to come with me.” Oh dear! Her worries had come true. She struggled to come up with an answer when he spoke again. “I feel that your knowledge of Middle Earth history would be quite useful and wise to have with me. I realize it sounds quite terrifying, but all I need from you is your mind.”

My mind? she thought, I’m just a girl! How can I bring anything to his journey that he can’t get from a man? I only just came of age a decade ago. Forty-four years is not very old in hobbit years. 

“I’m unsure. My family is back in the Shire, I don’t know how they would feel about this. I should really run it by them first.” Freesia looked down at her feet.

“Aren’t you quite old enough to make your own decisions?” he asked her.

“Well, somewhat. I am only forty-four and I am a girl.” she thought her answer was quite understandable, but his answer surprised her.

“Forty-four is perfectly old enough to go out on your own!” he said as if he was surprised at her answer, “I myself am only fifty. That is young for an elf-Dunedain hybrid.” he smiled.

Fifty? That is how old Frodo was. But I am still a girl. Girls don’t adventure, they stay home and take care of the family. Eowyn is the only exception. 

“Well, I don’t know why you would want a girl to come with you, but I suppose I could join you if that is what you really want.” she said, still hesitant to get into an adventure she had no way of knowing she would survive. She didn’t even know what exactly they would do to get the throne back.

“Great! Now, obviously we can’t take back Gondor just the two of us. I don’t suppose you know of any other hobbits that would like to join us? Maybe we can find a dwarf to join us.” Freesia could only think of one person that would like to join them.

Pegrioc.

Pegrioc was a descendant to Merriadoc “Merry” Brandybuck, a distant relative to Freesia. Peregrin “Pippin” Took had a son who married Sam’s daughter. Merry and Pippin were distant cousins. Thus making Freesia and Pegrioc distant relatives, which isn’t very strange, almost all hobbits are distant relatives.

Pegrioc was very much like Pippin. Reckless, unintelligent, sarcastic and hilarious. It was quite attractive in Freesia’s eyes, though she couldn’t admit it to anyone but her inner thoughts.

“I do know of one hobbit that would enjoy the journey, but I’m not quite certain how beneficial to the purpose of this adventure.” Freesia told Eoborn.

“Well, more is always better. I couldn’t care if he was just there for the sake of the credit, having more people along with us will make the journey bearable. I am certain we will find others who would love to join us.”

Freesia wasn’t sure if she wanted to be excited or terrified. She had always dreamed of going along on Frodo’s adventure, but now that she had the opportunity, she couldn’t decide.

Well, for now they just needed to worry about inviting Pegrioc along without the Scars deciding to join them first.

In that moment, Freesia suddenly realized something inconsistent about Eoborn’s story. Orcrist was supposed to be buried with Thorin. Only a sick villain would dig up the king of Erebor for the sake of getting his sword.

What was she getting herself into?!

Top Lord of the Rings Moments

I recently saw a few blogs about the top Middle Earth moments, but was slightly disappointed with them. Yes, they had some good ones, but they left out some of the best parts and the reasons why they are the best. So, I decided to write the best parts of Lord of the Rings and why, mostly regarding the brilliant acting!

11: Gandalf vs. the Balrog

gandalf

Everyone knows the line that happens at this point of the Lord of the Rings movies. We’ve heard tons of jokes and seen tons of memes regarding Gandalf’s line “You shall not pass!” What makes this part so great? Personally, I think this part of the movie is Ian McKellan’s best scene containing his best acting. When he shouts that line, you can feel its power. It’s as if you are there in that moment, in Frodo’s place, witnessing it.

10: Boromir’s death

boromirdeath

This scene contains a lot of character building elements in it for a few different characters. I literally don’t understand why some people hate Boromir so much, it was temptation, it was his fatal flaw, but it did not make him a villain. When he speaks his last words, you see his true honor. It’s amazing he has any honor with a father like his. He was corrupted by what his father wanted.

In this scene, we also see Legolas’ reaction to death. He seems to be confused, looking at Boromir wondering what is happening. He never understood death and how it affects people when it’s someone they care about. Also, Aragorn is characterized even more so than before. We see his true kingliness come out.

9: Eomer finds Eowyn on the battlefield

eomer

This scene has always been one of THE best scenes in the entire trilogy. Karl Urban does some breathtakingly amazing acting. When he finds his sister, thinking she is dead, his cries of pain and despair are so heart wrenching it’s as if my own sister has died. His acting is just so brilliant! The look on his face when this happens is painful.

8: Hiding from the black rider

rider

This scene is the spark that starts the painful burden Frodo has to carry. As Sauron’s servant is so close, almost touching them, Frodo feels the evil temptation of the ring. He almost puts it on, if it weren’t for his friends by his side. When we see the bugs crawling out and running away because of the ring wraith, it makes you feel almost exactly like the hobbits feel. If even the nasty, crawly little bugs are running from this guy, that is not a good sign. This is also when Merry understands somewhat what is going on.

7: Pippin’s song

pippinsong

This scene has some major character changing elements in it. Pippin used to be a care free, not very smart hobbit. He didn’t understand the danger they were in, he didn’t understand why Frodo had to leave, or why he had to leave his closest friend to go to Minas Tirith. When he is before the father of the man who desperately tried to save his life, resulting in his death, all the understanding and emotion hits him. And this is why he volunteers to work for Denethor.

His character deepens the most in the scene with his song, because he has seen Denethor send Faramir off to his death, not even caring. It breaks Pippin’s heart. As Faramir and his soldiers are riding off toward Osgiliath, Pippin sings a song that basically explains the entire movie’s tone. The words touch my heart every time, not to mention how great of a singer Billy Boyd is! The whole thing is wonderful!

6: Sam’s speech 

sam

Yet another part of the Lord of the Rings trilogy that everyone knows. Frodo has almost given up and Gollum has returned into Smeagol’s mind. Everything seems to be over and all hope seems to be lost. They were so close to Mordor and then they were taken to Osgiliath. Sam has to convince Frodo that it’s not over. They can’t give up and they WILL make it to the volcano. He does the one thing he can, he tells Frodo what they are holding on to that is keeping them going.

5: “The way is shut”

ghostking

The scene when Aragorn is trying to get the ghosts to serve their last duty in order to be freed is one that a lot of people think is strange. The fact that there are ghosts causes some people to not be sure how they feel about the movies. For some reason, ghosts put people off.

Nonetheless, this scene is a great one. Aragorn becomes so much more powerful and intimidating when he blocks the ghost’s attack with his sword. The ghost king’s reaction to the remade blade is almost funny, because he is so surprised. Yet, in order to keep himself just as threatening, the ghost king fades away, laughing. Which is yet another cool scene.

4: The beacons are lit

beacons

Again, another scene that is great thanks to Howard Shore’s brilliant music. I love watching, goosebumps forming, as each beacon lights and the music builds up. It’s great.

3: “No parent should have to bury their child.”

theoden

Yet another scene that is great thanks to brilliant acting. When Theoden is finally freed from Sauruman’s control, he finds out that his son died. Just the death of a child alone would break a man, but it is even worse as he realizes that he was not there for his son in his last moments, he didn’t even care because he was being controlled.

When Theoden says this line, and he begins to cry, it is yet another emotional scene that is so powerful. You can feel his emotions. Imagining being in his place, it becomes even more real.

2: The company is formed

Fellowship

The whole part of the first movie, from the forming of the fellowship up to the beginning of their journey is amazing. The hilarious moment when the three uninvited hobbits pop in. Pippin’s stupidity at the situation. It’s all great, but what makes this so amazing is when they, one by one, walk over the hill, the awesome music playing behind them, it’s just great. Music is one of the most powerful tools in provoking emotion.

1: Ride now!

death

It is no secret that this is almost the best part of all the movies. The power in Theoden’s speech is amazing. As he shouts those words, that will always be stuck in my mind, you just want to stand up and start shouting, “DEATH!” It’s almost disturbing…but anyone who has seen it should understand. It is so amazing.

0: Bilbo wants the ring

bilbowantshisring

I put this on here as zero, simply because it is not necessarily a great scene, it’s just hilarious and terrifying at the same time. When Bilbo reaches for the ring and his face turns into an almost Gollum-like face, you want to scream and then laugh your head off. I think everyone is in agreement that this is the scariest part of the entire trilogy.

Obviously, there are many many more great scenes throughout these movies, and don’t think I like any of the movie less than it deserves. The entire thing is amazing, and all the tiniest scenes affect me in different ways. Each character has their share of characterizing mastery, thanks to Peter Jackson and Howard Shore.

Honestly, I don’t really care what anyone now thinks of Peter Jackson after the Hobbit trilogy, he is still amazing and he did what he had to do in order to make amazing movies and form Tolkien’s brilliant literature into a reality. Middle Earth might as well be real, now that you can go and visit many of the areas that are now known as Middle Earth in New Zealand.

The Lord of the Rings will always be the best movie in the universe.

3) After Middle Earth: Orcrist

Freesia began to panic, thinking about the orcish man she had seen. She knew from Frodo’s story what it meant when a sword glowed blue. But Sting is still in the possession of the Shire. The only other swords she knew of that could glow were Orcrist and Glamdring. Glamdring was Gandalf’s sword and Orcrist was Thorin Oakenshield’s.

Who was this man and whose sword does he have?

The man noticed Freesia looking at him and immediately jumped up. Freesia worried that he had seen the look of recognition on her face and would come after her. He began to walk, she couldn’t see where he was going because he slipped into the crowd. She started to walk back to the innkeeper, hoping she would be able to go to her room before the man caught her.

She was only half way there when she felt a hand on her shoulder. She jumped. Turning around, she saw that it was the man. He grabbed her shoulder and pulled her along with him toward a back hallway.

Once they were out of earshot to the lobby, the man lifted off his hood. This was far too much like Frodo’s story to be a coincidence. The man’s hair was very unusual. It was cut very short, so short Freesia wasn’t sure how he got it that way. It was no wonder he wore a hood. Freesia noticed that there was just the slightest point in the man’s ears. Not enough to be anything but a man, but men don’t have ears like that.

“Who are you?” they both asked simultaneously.

Freesia spoke first, “What do you mean ‘who am I,’ you are the one who dragged me back here. I’m just a simple hobbit that is stopping by for the night.” The man was surprised at her aggressiveness.

“Well, how ’bout you tell me how you recognized my blade?” he said. Freesia wasn’t sure how to answer. So she just went ahead and told the truth.

“I read about it. My ancestor, Samwise Gamgee had a book that was written by Frodo and Bilbo Baggins about their adventures. Bilbo saw that blade, although I’m not sure which one it is.”

“Orcrist.” he said almost automatically.

“How do you have it?” Freesia asked.

“I do believe that is not your business.” he said.

do believe that my recognition of the blade is not yours.” she retorted.

“Very well. If you must know it came to me by my ancestor’s good friend. It was given to him by his relative, Dain Ironfoot, who inherited it from Thorin Oakenshield.” Freesia became excited about the matter. This, too, was suspected by the man.

“Oh dear, how delightful! I had always wanted to see the relics of the stories for my own eyes! Would you mind if I had a look at it?” she said.

The man was slightly taken aback. Nonetheless, he unsheathed the blade and let Freesia have a look.

“Oh wow! It is just as Old Bilbo had described! Oh how I wish I could have met the old hobbit, he passed Old Took, you know, who had once been the hobbit that lived longer than any other. Of course, he did have the ring that made him live longer and he–”

“Ring? What ring?” he asked.

“Oh, you must know the tale of how Frodo Baggins destroyed the One Ring to rule them all!” she said.

“Yes, of course I do. But you must tell me about this old Bilbo. I had heard the tale of the ring’s destruction, but how did this hobbit fellow come by it?”

Surely he couldn’t be serious! She had thought.

“Well! Bilbo Baggins found the ring while trapped in the goblin kingdom in the Misty Mountains! While down there, an odd little creature called Gollum threatened to eat the poor hobbit. They had a game of riddles, and thanks to that little trinket, or so he had called it at the time, Bilbo won the riddle game. Gollum did not like this, however, and he betrayed their deal, which was for Gollum to lead Bilbo out of the caves. When he ran off, he tripped and the ring slipped onto his finger, causing him to disappear! And that is how Old Gandalf discovered that the “trinket” was actually the One Ring of power!”

“You are quite smart for a small thing, aren’t you?” he said.

“Pardon me, but I take offense to that!” she said. Again the man looked taken aback. “Wait a moment, if that blade is glowing, that should mean an orc is nearby!” Freesia exclaimed. “But all the orcs were destroyed. How can that be glowing?”

“Have you not heard? If you have not heard, surely you have seen the creatures that have been wandering about.” he said.

“Of course!” Freesia said, “What was that awful thing? It chased me all the way here to Bree! I had been worried Bree was no longer a hospitable place.”

“Those are not orcs. They are Scars.”

“Yes, I have heard the term.”

“Scars are like orcs in only one way. They were tortured to become what they are now. Only, they weren’t once elves, they were once men. That is why I am here. If men are being tortured, then that means there is an evil on this earth that is creating monsters of my people. Or my ancestor’s people I should say.”

“You keep going on about your ancestors. Who are they?” Freesia asked.

“Well, my name is Eoborn. My ancestor is Aragorn, son of Arathorn. This is why my ears are pointed slightly. He did marry an elf, after all.”

“Oh! That is marvelous! To think that I would ever meet a descendant of the great king Aragorn! And that you are related to Elrond as well! It must be a lovely title to have!”

“It would seem so. However, I fear there is evil in the heart of Gondor. Had things gone rightly, I would have been king of Gondor. But seeing as I am part elf, the people of Gondor suddenly decided to make a purely man royal line. They didn’t want any elf mixed in. I don’t see how this is a problem, seeing as I hold the last bit of elf to ever walk the earth. I don’t see how I could have been a threat to the royal line.”

“How terrible!” Freesia said, “That does indeed sound as though someone is desperately grasping for the throne. Perhaps you are right about there being evil there. Only a man hungry for power would be so desperate to do such a thing.”

“That gives me a great deal of reassurance to know I am not the only one to think so. Even if you are just a little hobbit girl.” Freesia raised an eyebrow at him, who smiled ever so slightly.

“If this is the problem, why are you here? You said that that is what led you here.” Freesia asked.

“It’s funny you, of all people to run in to, mention this. I too had read about the story of Frodo Baggins and discovered how Frodo had come to be part of the story. Gandalf, the wisest wizard that walked middle earth, had said something about the strength of those with the smallest stature. I thought that perhaps, in order to claim my throne, I would need someone of a sort like that. So I came here, on my way to the Shire, to find someone to share in my adventure.”

Freesia’s eyes widened with surprise. An adventure? Please do not ask me to come!

2) After Middle Earth: Bree

Far ahead, Freesia could see a gate. It was quite large and looked to be beat up and rebuilt several times. The door on the gate was shut. Her legs were almost giving in. She couldn’t bear the thought of stopping at the door with the creature behind her still running. Chasing. There was no where else she could go.

Freesia might as well have barreled right into a wall; she threw her body against the door, afraid of what might happen if she slowed even a little. She pounded a few times, but the body slam did just as well. A small piece of wood on the door slid open, it was too high up for her to be seen, she started screaming for them to let her in.

Luckily, the doorman didn’t waste time checking the lower opening that was used for hobbits. Freesia could only hope that whoever was on the other side of the door grasped the situation and would let her in on assumption that it was in fact a hobbit. There was no doubt that whoever it was could see the creature not far behind her.

The door cracked open and Freesia pushed through as quickly as her little legs would let her. The door closed far quicker than it had opened. She let out a sigh of relief, hoping it wasn’t too soon to relax. Looking around the town, Freesia could see that things were not quite functional. Everyone was doing something, but they weren’t happy about it.

Some were building up stronger fences. Some were reinforcing houses. One was standing right in front of Freesia, checking to make sure she wasn’t an enemy.

The doorman looked to be not quite tall enough to be a man, but not quite short enough to be a hobbit or a dwarf. Freesia could only assume it was a dwarf based on old Frodo’s story. The dwarf was looking Freesia in the eye, trying to decide what to do with her. There was no way she could go back, at least not right now.

The only thing Freesia could think to do was ask questions.

“What was that thing?” she asked him. He stared at her in silence for another moment. It didn’t look as though he was going to say anything. As he began to talk, his beard shook up and down, with no sign of his mouth underneath the hair.

“That was a Scar.” he said, “I ain’t seen none like you ’round these parts. What are ye, a dwarf child?” Freesia was taken aback at the dwarf’s manner.

“I’m a hobbit.” was all she could say at first. She was anxious at the feeling of all the unfamiliarity around her. Living in the Shire, she had never seen any folk except hobbits. All other folk seemed like simply legend. Elves and wizards left middle earth long ago. Men and dwarves kept to themselves in their own lands.

Bree had been a crossroad for all sorts of folk. Men, dwarves, hobbits. All sorts of strangers stopped by to stay the night on their journeys. And that was just it, no one went on journeys any more. Everyone grew to keep to themselves and care nothing of what is going on around them.

“A hobbit, eh?” the dwarf said, “I heard of ye, little folk with no chance at survival out here in the world. Never did un’erstan’ what kep’ ye little people alive in that little ol’ town o’ yers. If ye ask me, the shire is t’ be jus’ one big trap. Ain’t gon’ be long before Scars make ther’ way into yer town an’ start feedin’ of ye. Here in Bree, we’s got the best protection system in all o’ new middle earth.” He rambled on about Bree and its greatness as Freesia thought about what he had said about the Shire being in danger.

Freesia interrupted. “What is going on in the world?” she asked him.

“Why, one can’t be sure. I’s only seen what’s goin’ on in here Bree, but some often folk’ll find themselves in here, tellin’ tales about ther’ poor little towns an’ they espect me to go on an’ help ’em with whatever little favors they’s seekin’. Ain’t hardly seen a man around in ages. Some’s sayin’ that all’s the men all turned into those Scar beasties. It’s quite a fright t’ think that all men is those flesh eatin’ monsters.”

“What turned them into that?” Freesia asked. It scared her to think that that many men had become those things.

“I reckon somethin’ awful happened to ’em t’ make ’em that way. Folks sometimes sayin’ it ain’t possible to live in peace wit’ out no evil. They says that when the elves lef’, they thought they brought the bad wif ’em, but bad can’t jus’ leave. There’s gotta be bad in the world t’ keep the balance.”

Freesia wasn’t quite sure why the dwarf was telling her all this. She’s just a small, insignificant hobbit with no reason to want to know the affairs of the world. What could one hobbit do to stop a race of monsters? Not even Frodo or Bilbo had been alone in their adventures, and no one would ever want to join Freesia on such a terrifying, deadly, and pointless quest.

“You’s best find a nice place to sleep, yer not goin’ t’ wanna leave here Bree ’til the night is gone an’ the sun’s come up. Scars can’t be in the sunlight.” Freesia took his advice and headed to the Prancing Pony. She hoped there would be some nice fellow, a descendant to Butterbur, that would help her find a place to rest.

Upon walking into the inn, Freesia felt as though she herself was in Frodo’s tale. Tell Gandalf we’ve arrived. She would say. Underhill, the name’s Underhill, and these are my friends.

Everything was not quite as she had imagined it. The aroma that filled the air made the scene more realistic.

Freesia walked up to the front desk. Clearing her throat loudly a couple times, she got the man’s attention. He had to have been the only man around here that wasn’t a Scar.

“Um, may I please have somewhere to stay and rest until morning?” she asked. The man stared down at her. For a moment she thought she would be turned away, after all, she had no money to pay with.

“A hobbit!” the man said. Freesia was surprised he knew what she was. “Of course you can stay here! What, did you think I was going to turn you away to the Scars? Besides, I haven’t had a single hobbit stay in my hobbit sized rooms since I joined the business. How’s about you have a seat and get yourself something to eat.”

Freesia was delighted that someone would be so kind to let her stay with no money. Maybe everyone was wrong about Bree. There didn’t seem to be anything wrong with it. Maybe no one wanted to come here because they heard bad tales about folk getting attacked on the road, never actually making it to Bree.

As she ate, Freesia looked around. It all seemed to fit the description perfectly. Tables, people. Even a strange man sitting in the corner. Wait. That’s odd. The moment Freesia noticed the man, he seemed to notice her as well. It was almost exactly like Strider, only, Freesia wasn’t sure this man was trustworthy as Strider had been, who actually later became king of Gondor.

Gondor. What had become of Gondor? And Rohan? Had they become old and run down like Bree has? They seemed so mighty and noble, but if all men have become Scars, then what’s left of the great kingdoms of men?

The man in the corner seemed to watch Freesia for a long, uncomfortable while. Freesia suddenly noticed something about the man that reminded her of another thing she had read about. He had a blade attached at his side. And it was glowing blue.

Book vs. Movie: Why the Changes?

Let me just get on my soap box for a moment.

First I would like to point out the obvious fact:

Books and movies are two completely different forms of entertainment. Why does that matter? Well, let me tell you.

Before you can criticize the changes made to a story line when put in movie form you have to realize why this previously stated fact is important.

Book: Imagery created by you.

Movie: Imagery created by filming team.

Book: Characters imagined by you.

Movie: Characters picked from real actors (I say real because you have to realize that you can’t find an actor/actress that looks exactly like the character, especially since everyone pictures them differently).

Book: Every detail in a scene has to be explained to a tee.

Movie: Every detail has to be created and is shown in a much shorter space of time than a written out description.

Book: Takes a long time to make a point, considering it is all written out.

Movie: Long paragraphs in a book are only a few seconds in a movie.

Book: Doesn’t need too much action and adventure in order to be a good story line.

Okay, before I say this one, it needs some explaining. This is somewhat more of an opinion, but sort of not. Okay, let me try to make this make more sense.

In today’s society, a movie will not get a good audience, or a good review, or the interest of the viewers unless it has action, romance, and humor. This wasn’t the case even just a decade ago. So, that brings the next point.

Movie: Needs action, romance and humor in order to be a “good” movie.

Need an example?

The Hobbit Movie Trilogy.

Notice,

Action: Would have been there anyway.

Romance: Tauriel and Kili.

Humor: Yeah… I’m pretty sure you can all see how this applied to these movies. Potty humor, funny (and I use that term lightly) trolls, and Bombur. Yes, just Bombur, and a little bit Ori. They were the comical relief of the movies. And sadly, they weren’t even funny. More annoying really.

So, can you see now why some of the changes from books to movie were “necessary?”

You may not have liked (I could almost definitely say didn’t like) the Tauriel-Kili thing, but that in a way is our fault. All the ratings, all the viewers, everything is ruled by our (or I guess, this generation’s) inability to enjoy a good movie without these three things.

I completely understand why Peter Jackson made the changes he did. For all we know, he could have been forced (or I guess required…same thing…) to add those things. I’m not saying I liked the out come of those decisions, but it wasn’t entirely his fault. He has been in the movie business for years, he has seen the developments, the required elements that get good ratings.

And this is also why Lord of the Rings was SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO much better. Because back ten some odd years ago, we didn’t have to have stupid humor. We didn’t have to watch movies that just wasted away our brains. We watched good movies.

I am also not saying that all movies today are stupid. But a lot of them are. Some very few movies (one being the Giver) actually have meaning. Even shows like Doctor Who lost their meaning. It’s all just filler time we need to waste on something other than sitting around.

I miss the good old days when I could watch a movie and think “Oh my goodness! What just happened!?” or “Wow! Mind blown!” or “I get it now!” or “Holy crap that was amazing!” or “I can totally see the symbolism in this!” Okay, okay, I’m done now.

So, next time you want to get angry at Peter Jackson because of the Hobbit movies, get angry at society first.

Chapter Three: Three Is Company-Part One

Even after Gandalf explains to Frodo that the ring is indeed the One Ring, Frodo doesn’t make any sign of leaving for the next two to three weeks. Frodo was very reluctant to go. In fact, the only thing that made it bearable was the thought that he would be following Bilbo and would be able to see him again after Frodo almost doubled his age. He thought little about the ring and the fate of it in the end.

Gandalf explains to Frodo that he is not to tell anyone he is leaving at all. Certainly not where he is going. Frodo himself doesn’t even know where he is to go. In Gandalf’s opinion, he should make for Rivendell, which Frodo would be delighted to do, and Sam even more so.

Quite a bit later, a rumor began to spread that Frodo was selling Bag End. The hobbits were uncertain why he would do so. There were many theories, of course, being hobbits and all. What’s worse is that he was selling it to the Sackville-Bagginses! But everyone had the common belief that Frodo was going back to Buckland.

After two months in Bag End, Gandalf announced he was leaving to take care of some business. He tells Frodo to stick to his plan unless Gandalf sent word for him to change them. Most importantly, he tells Frodo not to use the ring.

Time quickly passes and Frodo and Bilbo’s birthday comes. They celebrate and forget their troubles a little while. Gandalf does not come.

Interestingly, as Frodo spends his last day in Bag End, Lobelia Sackville-Baggins shows up, pridefully grasping what is now hers, and to show that Frodo did not respect her for how rude she is it says, “Frodo did not offer her any tea.” I find it funny that this is the most disrespectful thing one can do to another. Awe, the British and their tea. It’s great.

As Frodo is preparing finally to leave, he over hears Gaffer and someone with a strange voice discussing Frodo’s leave taking. Gaffer tells the person what all the hobbits had believed about Frodo going to Buckland. This makes Frodo hugely paranoid and decides not to take the main road. And thus his adventure finally begins.

Together, Frodo, Sam, and Pippin made their way on foot toward Frodo’s “new home,” where Merry is waiting.

The three hobbits walk for what seems like forever. Frodo finds himself repeating the words of Bilbo’s song, The Road Goes Ever On and On. What Frodo doesn’t realize is that it was Bilbo he heard it from. He feels as though he made it up, in a way, but he thinks that it certainly does sound like Bilbo’s rhyming.

As they continue walking, Sam says he hears a horse galloping far behind them. Frodo hopes that it is Gandalf, but he has a feeling that it is not. Because of this, Frodo suggests that they stay off the road.

The next part is almost exactly like it is in the movie adaptation. Frodo stands in the middle of the road, hesitating to get off the road as his friends are already hiding. Finally he hides with them as a huge, black horse turns the corner. When the horse and it’s hooded rider reach the spot adjacent to where the three are hiding, the rider sits quietly, making a sound as if he is sniffing.

As the rider and his horse stand there, Frodo suddenly feels a fear that he will be discovered. He finds himself thinking about the ring and fingering it. He feels tempted to use it. Bilbo had used it. So why should Frodo not use it? The rider slowly begins to trot away until it is out of sight, and Frodo’s temptation fades.

Haldir: The Under-appreciated Elf

Haldir is by far one of my favorite characters in the Lord of the Rings. (And Craig Parker who plays him is a nice guy too! Thank you Salt Lake Comic Con! 😉 ) He doesn’t play a very big role, but he is very important character in some ways.

Haldir, if you don’t know, is the elf whom the fellowship first meet when they stumble on Lothlorien. He is the one with the famous line, “the dwarf breathes so loud we could have shot him in the dark.”

The most important scene Haldir is in is the battle at Helms Deep. Everyone thinks they aren’t going to make it out, but then the elves show up. Haldir nobly helps the men, whose lives are almost irrelevant compared to his. He did not have to do that at all. Even worse (*spoilers* for those who haven’t watched), it ends in his death.

The best/worst scene of his is the death scene. Good as in the symbolism and acting, bad as in depressing! Anyway, when Haldir is hit in the back by an orc, he starts to realize what is happening. He sees all the dead elves around him, his friends and relatives. He realizes that death isn’t impossible for him. Just because he can live forever, doesn’t mean he can’t be killed. He feels death slowly encompassing him, it makes the watcher realize how close death is for all these important characters. Death can come to anyone, being a main character doesn’t save you from it.

This scene is much like the scene with Legolas, just less subtle. It is another motivating death, like Gandalf’s and Boromirs. It is not meant for the watcher to put themselves in his place, but in the place of all those who see the death and are motivated to fight harder for him. Death shouldn’t cause us to give up, but to fight harder.

The one that ends up with Haldir dying in his arms is Aragorn. Aragorn tends to be the one witnessing the death of those he loves. Since he is the Christ-like character in the situation, he is the one he is saddened by the brutal death of those he cares for, like how Christ loves all his spirit brothers and sisters. Aragorn sees death happen to Elves and Men, this shows how Christ loves us no matter our background, no matter our race. Haldir is a supporting character meant to strengthen Aragorn’s character. While also motivating us specifically.