Top Hobbit Moments

Well, you heard the top moments from the Lord of the Rings, now it’s time for the top moments from the Hobbit! As we all well know, the Hobbit movies weren’t up to their potential, but that does not mean they weren’t good movies.

For those who are strange and have not yet seen the movies or read the book, there are some spoilers ahead.

10:  Thorin’s farewell


Yet another moment made great thanks to brilliant acting. Martin Freeman did absolutely FANTASTIC with his acting as Thorin is dying. Straight away we see his denial of the situation. He tries desperately to save him, reassuring him that he will live because the eagles have come to save them. He had gone far past hope and was now just in denial. This is acting!

9: Bilbo encounters Smaug


Everyone has got to love when Smaug has his conversation with Bilbo. Almost word for word from the book! Benedict Cumberbatch’s voice was so brilliantly used to create the voice of the dragon. Everyone loves a good dragon, as it was once said, “it’s simply not an adventure worth telling if there aren’t any dragons.”

Fun Fact: Benedict Cumberbatch memorized the entire dialogue of Smaug from the book and voice acted it through twice, whilst wearing the motion capture suit and crawling around like a lizard (Komodo dragon specifically).

8: Thunder battle


I love this scene because of how cool and intense it looks. It is cool to see what rock giants might look like, thinking of them as if they are actual beings, not just people made of rock. The CGI at this part is one of the only parts that was done well with the animation (the other stuff did not need to be animated).

7: That’s what Bilbo Baggins hates


This song was a commodity that I just thought was necessary. I love to see things added word for word from the book. This song was also up beat and entertaining to follow. I especially love when Bofur is bumping around dishes with his elbow as he is playing his flute. Tolkien had so many songs, it’s obvious he loved music, so it is essential that that is portrayed in his book’s movie adaptation.

6: Misty Mountains song


Another song that was necessary. I love love love this song! All the deep voices of these men put together with perfect wording and feeling. This is a song that gets the listener to think about the words, and if you don’t at the beginning, when you look back at it afterward, it is pretty much a summary of their journey to be.

5: Thorin’s Dragon sickness


Of all the things that Tolkien wanted to portray with his stories, this is one of the most important. Tolkien was all about symbolism, and with Thorin’s dragon sickness, which we see more clearly with the Balrog in Moria, he was trying to show what greed and temptation does to a person. When Thorin says the exact same thing Smaug said, with Smaug’s voice at the same time, it is super cool. It is interesting to see how all that treasure corrupted even the most noble of dwarves.

4: Bilbo comes back


The scene right after the goblin tunnels, when Thorin thinks Bilbo left, is a great scene. I love Bilbo’s little speech about how he does miss his old life and how he realizes that he doesn’t fit in, but what matters is that he is willing to fight with them to win back their home, where they fit in. It is cool to see that even though Bilbo is small and somewhat wimpy, he has the courage to do the right thing and help other.

3: Gollum


I almost would leave this section saying, “nuff said,” but it deserves more than that. I love Gollum. Especially thanks to Andy freaking amazing Serkis. His work with Gollum is just pure talent. Everyone loves the scene with Gollum and his riddles. To hear so many done word for word as well was great.

2: Thorin’s acceptance 


I know I’m not alone when I say I was so angry at Thorin when he gets up after being saved by eagles and starts talking to Bilbo. We were all almost certain he was legitimately angry at Bilbo for his act of courage. I was almost in tears when Thorin admits he was wrong and gives Bilbo a hug. I was so happy. You could see they had formed a friendship that would last longer than their life times. To admit your fault, especially as a king, takes a huge amount of courage.

And to go right along with this is when Bilbo saves Thorin’s life. You just want to jump out of your seat and cheer him on. I was so happy when this happened. Such a small guy taking on a huge, purely evil orc. Amazing!

1: Bard’s encounter with Smaug


I have to say this was my all time favorite scene. The acting in this scene was perfect! When Bard’s bow breaks, and his son had just come to give him the black arrow, and Bard has to balance the arrow on Bain’s shoulder! Bain’s acting was so perfect! The fear that you could almost feel through his acting as he can hear a huge, deadly dragon coming right toward him. And Bard, you can see how much he loves his son and cares for him. And looking at his son right in front of him as he is preparing to kill the dragon makes you realize that he knows exactly who he is doing this for, he is staring right at the reason!

This was the scene that made me love Bard and Bain! I just love them! They became my favorite characters through one short scene. Their acting was just amazing!

No matter what anyone says, these movies were good. They weren’t 100% accurate, but we already should know that it’s impossible for that to happen. The actors that were chosen provided for an amazing trilogy thanks to their wonderful acting talents. Don’t let the negative critics get you down, these movies are so great!


Meriadoc: The Responsible Hobbit

Merry is the logical Hobbit between him and Pippin. He is constantly trying to keep Pippin out of trouble. Merry’s best attribute is his desire to fight for what is right. He sees all this fighting and death around him and all he wants is to help his friends.

The instant the black riders come after the Hobbits just outside of Hobbiton, Merry knows that there is something Frodo has that they are after. In the book, Merry actually knew about the ring, or rather saw what it did. One day, Merry saw Bilbo put on the ring, after that, he sent Sam to go investigate and listen to what happens in Bag End (that means Sam really was dropping eaves! 😉 ). Merry had an idea what was going on from the very beginning. It isn’t until later that he realizes the magnitude of the situation.

We get a clue at how ignorant he starts off. When at Weathertop, he foolishly lights a fire with his buddies, not realizing that he can’t have all the many regular meals whenever he wants anymore, especially when there are nine evil Sauron’s servants tracking them.

When Merry sees Frodo leaving the fellowship at Amon Hen, he immediately understands and tries to lead the orcs away from him. He completely disregards his own safety for the sake of his friend. He realizes later that his carelessness in his attempt to save one friend resulted in the death of another. This could be one of the reasons he was so fixated on helping his friends in battle, because he doesn’t want to feel as though he can’t do any good.

When Hobbits are with Treebeard, Merry is trying to convince Treebeard to fight with them. He figures that the size of the ents would be the perfect strategic advantage. When Treebeard takes an entire day, completely disregarding something that is so important to Merry, it frustrates him to the point where he feels that he really can’t do any good in this war that has taken over normal life. He pretty much gives up. Thankfully for him, Pippin managed to convince Treebeard to head toward Isengard, where he sees the destruction Saruman has caused.

If it weren’t for this tender mercy, Merry wouldn’t have ever made it into battle, defending what he believes in and helping his friends. Merry is an example of our willingness and drive to do what’s right and help others. We all want something, we all should want what’s best for those we care about.

Merry realizes fully the extent of the damage Sauron has brought to the world when he sees his closest friend forced to leave him. Seeing Pippin struggle against such evil, suffer from such a trial, he realizes how much he cares for Pippin and doesn’t want him to have to ever suffer at the hands of such evil.

Imagine. Remember the way Pippin reacted when he was holding the Palentir? He struggled, he couldn’t even let go. If this were your brother, sister, closest friend or relative, how would that make you feel? Personally, it would scare me to death! I would never want to see anyone, let alone my closest friend have to deal with such a thing.

You could compare this to seeing your family members go through trials. Maybe you have a family member struggling with addiction, or health problems, or maybe even lost someone you loved to a disease or an accident and it hurt someone you care about to the point where you don’t know what will happen to them or if they will recover from such hardships.

When you see your family suffer, it changes what is important to you. When once you only cared about all your meals and having a good laugh or pipeweed, you now want only to save your friends and family and get rid of what things cause them pain.

We see Merry’s enthusiasm best when he is with Eowyn on the way to Pellenor. He is training, practicing, and preparing to fight for his loved ones. His enthusiasm grows dramatically as he gets better and better and sees that he does have the potential to do good. When Theoden tells him that he cannot come to battle, it’s as if he is reliving the moment when he thought Treebeard would just take him home. Only this time he doesn’t have Pippin to say something clever to help him. He realizes how much he needs Pippin in his life only to feel like he will never see him again.

Eowyn becomes his next tender mercy. When he feels like no one will take him with them to fight, Eowyn sweeps in to give him his chance.

Through Merry’s characterization, we can see that we do have a chance to help our loved ones. We may feel like there is no way we can do anything for them. What can I do to stop someone from using drugs or alcohol? I can’t just tell them to stop or take it from them. I have no control over their choices. While some of that is true, we still have the power to be an influence and example in their lives. They know what they are doing is not right, but without you by their side, they might never stop or get better. Simply being there for them can do a lot. We just have to support them and help them when they ask for it.

Even though it isn’t likely for someone who is struggling to ask for help, we can still do something. Maybe drop a comment here and there. Mention little things that touch lightly on the subject and try to spark a conversation that will get them realizing they need help or asking for help. It is never too late.

Merry shows us that we should want what’s best for our family, biological or otherwise. There is always something we can do. We can’t give up on them. And even when we feel like it’s over, God will help us get back on the saddle. He will provide those tender mercies that will keep us going. And we will never have to worry about waiting on the edge of a battle we can’t escape.

The Grey Havens

The Grey Havens is a place, one of the only places, that leads to the ocean. The ocean, because it is the origin of all life, and also because of the mysteries beneath, is symbolic of life and mystery. One could even say it represents the mysteries of life. But, why would Tolkien use the ocean to represent the exit from life? Well, the ocean is the mystery of the beginning of life, and many believe that after death, we will return back to where we came from. Thus the ocean could represent the beginning and end of life.

The journey into the west is symbolic of translation. The city of Enoch in the Old Testament was translated, as was Elijah and few others. Translation meaning going into heaven without separating spirit and body. One of my all time favorite songs is Into the West, sung by Annie Lennox. It is a song about the Grey Havens.

This song literally almost brings me to tears, especially with the video. You can hear it talk about the mysteries of the other side of the sea, or heaven. It says that even though you have been through so much hardship and trial, you don’t have to be afraid, you will be going to a better place, full of joy and rest, no longer worrying about the fears and pains of the world.

I don’t know how, but Peter Jackson did an AMAZING job interpreting the Lord of the Rings. It keeps all the elements of the symbolism and even adds to it, whether it be intentionally or not. The Grey Havens is a beautiful thing, representing the good that comes after evil. Just as the night will soon become day, good will soon overtake evil. It is a beautiful, beautiful analogy that makes me feel that we don’t have to be afraid of the future because it will all end with joy and gladness.

Frodo at the Grey Havens

All those who go into the west may represent the apostasy, when God’s word left the earth. This leaves the thought of the restoration up to us, to decide for ourselves what the restored truth would have been like in Tolkien’s world. Who knows, maybe at one point I might write a short story of my own interpretation, unless of course anyone disagrees and lets me know if it’s a bad idea. I wouldn’t plan to publish, of course, but just as a blog. (Let me know your thoughts about that in the comments if you like!)

Anyhow, the Grey Havens is one of the best parts of the Tolkien world because it shows that Tolkien himself was confident in his future and prepared for the paradise he would come to after his death. It gives us a glimpse into the hopes and faith he had, which is amazing! I hope that we can all find it in us to be joyful about what is to come for us in the future. I sure would like to partake of such happiness!

Also, when Frodo goes into the west, he says goodbye to his friends who are all crying. This is especially comforting for those who have lost loved ones. It shows that, even when we mourn for our loved ones, we can be comforted that they will have endless joy and we will be able to be with them in that joy when it is our time. I don’t want to say I’m excited to die, because that sounds crazy or something, but I do want to say I am excited for the joy that will come from it!

And, now that I sound like I’m preaching or something, I will leave you with a quote:

“The grey-rain curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.” -J.R.R. Tolkien